Archive

Tag Archives: cebu

0 – Wala
1 – Usa
2 – Duha
3 – Tulo
4 – Upat
5 – Lima
6 – Unom
7 – Pito
8 – Walo
9 – Siyam
10 – Napulo / Pulo
11 – Napulo’g usa
20 – kawhaan
21 – Kawhaa’g usa
30 – Katloan
31 – Katloa’g usa
40 – Kap-atan
41 – Kap-ata’g usa
50 – Kalim-an
51 – Kalim-a’g usa
60 – Kanum-an
61 – Kanum-a’g usa
70 – Kapitoan
71 – Kapitoa’g usa
80 – Kawaloan
81 – Kawaloa’g Usa
90 – Kasiyaman
91 – Kasiyama’g usa

100 – Usa ka Gatos
101 – Usa ka Gatos ug Usa
120 – Usa ka Gatos ug kawhaan
121 – Usa ka Gatos ug kawhaa’g usa

1,000 – Usa ka Libo
1,001 – Usa ka Libo ug usa
1,020 – Usa ka Libo ug kawhaan
1,021 – Usa ka Libo ug kawhaa’g usa
1,100 – Usa ka Libo ug gatos
1,120 – Usa ka Libo’g gatos ug kawhaan

10,000 – Laksa
1,000,000 – Usa ka Yukot
1,000,000,000 – Usa ka Wakat

Courtesy of GMA 7- Lupang Hinirang (GMA 7) video

To learn more about Datu Silapulapu click here – wwwhistoricalconundrums.blogspot.com/2009/10/claim-of-sen.html

“Datu Silapulapu”

Note – “Their holding the Kalasag (Shield) wrong, the round shape of the kalasag should be below not above”

“Conquestadors on the shorelines”

“HITIN MITSURGI STYLE!! ? 😀 ”

“Abaniko or Pamaypay style of Filipino Kali perhaps? :)”

Note – “Thier holding the Kampilan (Sword) wrong, the straight edge of the sword should be facing forward””

We all know what happen to Magellan during that day! Rest in Peace””

Art done by Akopito

The Aginid is about Sri Lumay of Sumatra who settled in Sugbo with his son, Sri Alho, ruling the south known as Sialo which included Valladolid, Carcar, up to Santander. This should have long been part of our required readings.

“His other son, Sri Ukob, ruled the north known as Nahalin which includes the present towns of Consolacion, Liloan, Compostela, Danao, Carmen, and Bantayan. As a ruler, Sri Lumay was known to be strict, merciless, and brave. He assigned magalamags to teach his people to read and write ancient letterings. He ordered routine patrols by boats from Nahalin to Sialo by his mangubats (warriors).

“Although a strict ruler, Sri Lumay was a loving person that not a single slave ran away from him. During his reign, the Magalos (literally destroyers of peace) who came from the South from time to time invaded the island to loot and hunt for slaves. Sri Lumay commanded to burn the town each time the southerners came to drive them away empty handed. Later, they fought these Magalos so that they leave the town for good.

“The town was thus permanently called Kang Sri Lumayng Sugbo, or Sri Lumay’s scorched town. Trading was vibrantly carried on by Sri Lumay’s people with merchants from China, Japan, India, and Burma in Parian, located at the northeastern part of Cebu City.

“The archipelago was strategically positioned in southeast Asia that it naturally became part of the trade route of the ancient world. Agricultural products were bartered for Chinese silk cloths, bells, porcelain wares, iron tools, oil lamps, and medicinal herbs. From Japan, perfume and glass utensils were usually traded with native goods. Ivory products, leather, precious and semi-precious stones and sarkara (sugar) mostly came from the Burmese and Indian traders.

“Sri Lumay was killed in one of the battles against the magalos and was succeeded by his youngest son Sri Bantug who ruled Singhapala (Mabolo district today).

“Bantug carried on his father’s rules throughout his reign. He organized umalahukans (reporters) to urge people in Nahalin and Sialo to obey his orders, especially on agricultural production and defense.

“During Sri Bantug’s time, Sugbo, Nahalin, and Sialo thrived on subsistence, self-sufficient economy. He died in an epidemic which spread in the island and was succeeded by his youngest son Sri Humabon.

“Under Humabon, the sibo or sibu in Parian became more progressive. Here, the “sinibuayng hingpit” (meaning a place for full trade) was carried on. The word Cebu is thus coined from the old word sibo, an old word for barter, trade, or swap.

Akopito – akopito.weebly.com/suwat-bisaya.html

Introduction of Bisaya script (Suwat Bisaya)

Bisaya chart 2013

Badlit script / Suwat Bisaya (Baybayin Bisaya) – is an Ancient pre-Filipino writing system, it’s member of the Brahmic family and closely related to other writing system in Southeast Asia, Badlit is an Abugida or an alpha-syllabary writing system, like most writing system used in Southeast Asia, where any consonants is pronounced with a vowel and using a diacritical marks to express other vowels. It is written from left to right and requires no spaces between words, space is use only after end of a sentence or punctuation, although in modern writing it usually contains spaces after each word to enhance readability.

Suwat Bisaya has 20 phonemes. There are Fifteen consonants: Ba, Ka, Da, Ga, Ha, La, Ma, Na, Nga, Pa, Ra, Sa, Ta, Wa and Ya . There are five vowels: A, E, I, O, U

Pantingog (vowels)

In ancient times, before the arrival of the Spanish in the Philippines, Bisaya had three vowels phonemes: /a/. /i/ and /u/. This was later expanded into five vowels with the introduction of Spanish words. the vowels are /a/, /e/, /i/, /o/ and /u/

Vowel

Katingog (Consonants)

There are Fifteen basic consonants:

consonants

Fifteen basic consonants of Suwat Bisaya b, k, d, g, h, m, n, ŋ, p, r, s, t, w, j, followed by the inherent vowel /a/ ‘as shown above.


Bisaya Consonant names depending on the points of articulation:

“Dala + ” when points touches
“Agi + ” when air passes to points
“Pugong + ” covering the velum then release
“Tulon + ” covering the velum, air passes through nasal

Consonant name 1

Kudlit (Diacritical marks)

Suwat Bisaya is an Abugida, cross between a syllabary and an alphabet writing system. They use the same basic consonants, this combine them with a Diacritical mark called a Kudlit, the kudlit allows you to change the default /a/ sound of any of the basic consonants character.

kudlitset

kudlit

Punctuation mark
Panulbok

Records of Bisaya characters

All Recorded Character chart

Related Page:

– How to write Suwat Bisaya [Click here]