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MBF PADAYON

Download updated (Bisaya MBF Padayon):
http://www.deviantart.com/download/347286206/bisaya_modern_badlit_font___padayon_by_akopito-d5qrjr2.zip
Original file post – http://fav.me/d5qrjr2

February 2013 update –
* added Light and Bold Bisaya(MBF)-Padayon font style to folder
* Character fix
* Kudlit fix
* Punctuation Mark fix
March 2013 update –
* added modern Bisaya Numeral symbols
* added Additional punctuation mark ( ~ . – )

Dagway sa katiguwangan Bisaya

http://akopito.deviantart.com/art/The-Face-of-Feudal-Bisaya-347601352

Dagway sa Katigulangan Bisaya
(The Face of feudal Visayan)

The Face tattoo is only restricted for those Elite Warriors of Feudal Visayas, according to Book Barangay sixteenth-century philippine culture and society by William Henry Scott, ‘Bangut’ is what they called the face-tattoo, other Visayan language probably? had a different term for the face-tattoo, the design which mimics a crocodiles jaw is called ‘langi’ it also mentioned about a beak design, In Pigafettas journal he mentioned that Rajah Humanbon of Cebu had a flame-like design tattoo on his face.

“The Red head-gear or Pudong/Purong is what they called “Magalong”, it signifies the most valiant warrior in Feudal Visayas.”

Sugilanonsakabungturanbohol
_

English Translation:

The story of The Chocolate hills of Bohol written in Badlit / Bisaya Baybayin

Many years ago, at the foot of Happy Mountain,
there lived a wealthy couple who had an only daughter.
The daughter was good-looking, but she was arrogant,
mean, and lazy. She was called Amada. The couple had a
neighbor, a wise woman and mother of twins. The twins
were called Ruben and Teresa. They were kind to
everyone, and they grew to love God’s creatures around
them. Everyday they knelt and bowed their heads to pray.

One bright morning Amada, Ruben, and Teresa were
playing in Amada’s garden when an old woman came by
and begged for alms. Ruben and Teresa dug into their
pockets but did not find anything. So Teresa took off her
pearl necklace and gave it to the beggar. Amada did not
like the idea. She tried to grab the necklace. She threw
stones and splashed water at the beggar. However, the
beggar did not let go of the pearls.

Instead, she shouted angrily, “You are unkind and
rude. I’ll take you somewhere to teach you good
manners. On the other hand, the kind children will be
rewarded.” The woman took Amada away. Ruben and
Teresa went to Amada’s parents and told them what had
happened.
Although Amada lived with the old woman, who turned
out to be a fairy, she still did not change her ways. She
slung sticks at the fairy and did other mean things. The
fairy promised to give Teresa’s pearls to Amada if she
would become good.

One night Ruben heard a call. He thought it was
Amada. So he went out with Teresa and headed towards
where the voice seemed to have come from. They walked
and walked until they reached the house of a giant. The
giant was happy to see them. He thought his supper was
assured that night. The giant’s wife begged him not to eat
the two children. The stars began to fall. Little brown
soldiers came in line and fought the giant. When the fight
was over, Amada had become a changed girl. She became
very kind. She was also happy to be with Teresa and
Ruben again.

The brown soldiers ran away with the children until they
reached home safely. The pearls that Amada received from
the fairy were scattered into the fields as a symbol of
kindness and humility. They became hard chocolate drops
and grew into chocolate hills. Today they are the famous
Chocolate Hills of Carmen, Batuan, and Borja in Bohol.

BisayaMBF(ink)

 

Download Font zip folder here: Bisaya MBF (Ink)

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I added new Tuning sound marks or (Paghuni sa pantingog kudlit) this are,
– long sound vowel (Taas pantingog),
– a glottal stop (Balî pantingog),
– a “ya sound” (Ya kudlit)
“which change any consonant inherent vowel to “ya” example: Dya, Sya etc.”
– a “ang sound” (ang kudlit)
“which adds any consonant inherent vowel to “ang sound” example: Kang, Dang etc.”

which I based my modern kudlit/mark on the Kawi script diacritical mark,

The design of the symbols are based on Visayan Tattoo and other austronesian elements, which represent both Upperworld (curvature characters) and Underworld (V shape characters) elements according to Austronesian beliefs (reference).
(I’m going to post that soon.)
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Bisaya Font Base on 5

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         
There are words in Visayan that has the same spelling but different sound and meaning, this is the reason why we need to implement additional tuning marks,
for example the word “Baga” which means “scorching” in Sinugbu language, there are other words that has the same spelling like “Bagâ” which means “Thick”
and “bágá” which means “lungs” both has the same spelling but different sound vowels and meaning.

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and by the way I also based my Vowel killer on Kawi script:
(Notice the bird shape pattern, the shape represent the upperworld element (reference).)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Learn more about the Modern Kudlit by clicking the link below here:
 
http://akopito.weebly.com/modern-kudlit.html

Art done by Akopito

The Aginid is about Sri Lumay of Sumatra who settled in Sugbo with his son, Sri Alho, ruling the south known as Sialo which included Valladolid, Carcar, up to Santander. This should have long been part of our required readings.

“His other son, Sri Ukob, ruled the north known as Nahalin which includes the present towns of Consolacion, Liloan, Compostela, Danao, Carmen, and Bantayan. As a ruler, Sri Lumay was known to be strict, merciless, and brave. He assigned magalamags to teach his people to read and write ancient letterings. He ordered routine patrols by boats from Nahalin to Sialo by his mangubats (warriors).

“Although a strict ruler, Sri Lumay was a loving person that not a single slave ran away from him. During his reign, the Magalos (literally destroyers of peace) who came from the South from time to time invaded the island to loot and hunt for slaves. Sri Lumay commanded to burn the town each time the southerners came to drive them away empty handed. Later, they fought these Magalos so that they leave the town for good.

“The town was thus permanently called Kang Sri Lumayng Sugbo, or Sri Lumay’s scorched town. Trading was vibrantly carried on by Sri Lumay’s people with merchants from China, Japan, India, and Burma in Parian, located at the northeastern part of Cebu City.

“The archipelago was strategically positioned in southeast Asia that it naturally became part of the trade route of the ancient world. Agricultural products were bartered for Chinese silk cloths, bells, porcelain wares, iron tools, oil lamps, and medicinal herbs. From Japan, perfume and glass utensils were usually traded with native goods. Ivory products, leather, precious and semi-precious stones and sarkara (sugar) mostly came from the Burmese and Indian traders.

“Sri Lumay was killed in one of the battles against the magalos and was succeeded by his youngest son Sri Bantug who ruled Singhapala (Mabolo district today).

“Bantug carried on his father’s rules throughout his reign. He organized umalahukans (reporters) to urge people in Nahalin and Sialo to obey his orders, especially on agricultural production and defense.

“During Sri Bantug’s time, Sugbo, Nahalin, and Sialo thrived on subsistence, self-sufficient economy. He died in an epidemic which spread in the island and was succeeded by his youngest son Sri Humabon.

“Under Humabon, the sibo or sibu in Parian became more progressive. Here, the “sinibuayng hingpit” (meaning a place for full trade) was carried on. The word Cebu is thus coined from the old word sibo, an old word for barter, trade, or swap.